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W S Sims DE-1059 - History

W S Sims DE-1059 - History

W. S. Sims

(DE-1059: dp. 2,887 (f.); 1. 438'; b. 47'; dr. 25'; s. 27 k.; cpl. 245; a. 15", 4 15.5" tt., ASROC, BPDSMS;
cl. Knox)

W. Sims (DE-1059) was laid down on 10 April 1967 by Avondale Shipyards, Inc., Westwego La.; launched on 5 January 1969; sponsored by Mrs. Robert H. Hopkins; and commissioned on 3 January 1970, Comdr. C. M. Plumly in command.

Following an extended fitting-out period at the Charleston Naval Shipyard and a restricted availability at Jacksonville Shipyards for correction of minor construction faults, W. Sims became fully operational in June of 1970~ and proceeded to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for shakedown training. After a two and one-half month post-shakedown availability at the Charleston Naval Shipyard to correct deficiencies uncovered during shakedown and to install additional equipment, W. Sims put to sea in November to evaluate the feasibility of installing the LAMPS (Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System). She was the first ship of her class to have a manned helicopter land on her deck; and, during the next four days, she successfully demonstrated the capability of these fine new ships to operate manned helicopters. Upon completion of the testing, the escort proceeded to her home port, Mayport, Fla., for the holiday season.

On 11 January 1971, W. Sims left Mayport with personnel from the Key West Testing and Evaluation Detachment embarked. The project consisted Qf six cruises, numbered 0 to 5, where W. Sims operated with various types of submarines in order to determine the capabilities and limitations of the installed long range underwater sound detection equipment. The tests continued throughout the year and took the escort to such ports as New Orleans; Fredriksted, St. Croix; San Juan, Puerto Rico; And Nassau, New Providence, Bahama Islands.

The ship returned to Mayport in time for Thanksgiving and, between 22 November and 31 December 1971, was involved in a fleet standdown period during which officials representing the squadron, flotilla, and type commanders conducted a series of inspections.

The final cruise. for the Key West testing project began on 4 January 1972. W. Sims returned to Mayport on 15 January and spent the next month prepa~ing for operations with the 6th Fleet.

On 15 February 1972, the ocean escort sailed for the Caribbean to participate in "LantFltRedEx 2-72" and then proceeded on to the Mediterranean. On 10 March, W. Sims inchopped to the 6th Fleet and took part in various antisubmarine exercises besides visiting Barcelona, Spath, and Naples, Italy. From 27 March to 6 April, the destroyer escort and William V. Pratt (DLG 13) maintained a close surveillance of Soviet naval units in the south central Mediterranean.

W. Sims visited Gaeta, Italy, and Golfe Juan, France, before taking part in Operation "Quickdraw," a combined United States and Italian naval exercise held on 17 April. A visit to San Remo, Italy, and tender availability at Naples followed the exercise.

On 8 May 1972, the ship joined in a combined naval exercise, Operation "Dawn Patrol," with British, French, and Italian warships. After visiting Sfax, Tunisia, W. Sims conducted special surveillance
operations on Soviet submarines from 23 May to 10 June. The ship then participated in Operation "Good Friendship" with the Turkish Navy and a second Operation "Quick Draw" with the Italian Navy. During August, the crew enjoyed leave at San Remo, Italy; Barcelona, Spain; and Theoule, France. When Vreeland (DE-1068) relieved W. Sims late that month, the latter headed home and returned to Mayport on 5 September.

Upon completing a month-long standdown period, the ship commenced an extended availability at the Jacksonville Shipyards, Jacksonville, Fla., which lasted through the eud of the year and the first three months of 1973. The ship then carried out post-avail ability sea trials. The -discrepancies which the testing uncovered were corrected by 9 April. The following day, the -ocean I escort steamed south to Roosevelt Roads Puerto Rico, and joined the surface missile fleet i~ gunfire support exercises conducted at the Atlantic Fleet weapons range, Culebra Island.

On 8 May 1973, W. Sims arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for refresher training, but an engineering casualty soon forced her to return to Mayport for repairs. When the corrections had been made, she returned to Cuba and conducted refresher training from the end of May to mid-June. Upon returning to Mayport, the ship executed,a LAMPS workup from 17 June to 9 July.

From 12 to 26 July, W. Sims participated in "LantRedEx 1-74" in the Caribbean. As her next assignment, the ship evaluated the basic point defense missile. The ocean escort returned to her home port on 10 August, enabling the crew to enjoy a period of leave and liberty.

W. Sims sailed for North Atlantic and Mediterranean operations on 14 September. Upon arrival, the ship held a LAMPS demonstration for the Royal Netherlands Navy in Amsterdam. At the time of W. Sims' inchop to the 6th Fleet, the Middle East was in a state of war. For the first month and one-half, the ocean escort's-duties involved operations in support of United States interests in the Middle East crisis. From 26 to 30 November, W. Sims guarded the King of Morocco embarked on the French luxury liner Roussilion en route to the Arab oil conference held in Algiers, Algeria. The King, as a gesture of gratitude, sent the officers and men a gift of three tons of oranges, tangerines, sardines, and orange juice. After visiting Naples, Italy, and Rota, Spain, W. Sims spent the 1973 holiday season at Valencia, Spain.

On 4 January 1974, W. Sims stood out of Valencia harbor to operate with Independence (CVA-42). After a visit to Rota and exercises with America (CVA-66), the escort ship participated in a search for survivors of a small British trawler; and four of six missing sailors were recovered. On 25 January, she proceeded via Gibraltar to Casablanca, Morocco, where she arrived on 1 February. The following day, the Soviet military attache came on board for a special tour of the ship. After brief stops at Rota and at Bermuda, W. Sims arrived at Mayport on 14 February.

During March and April, the ship took part in interim-sea -control ship evaluation operations in waters between Jacksonville and Charleston. She returned to her home port on 27 April and underwent various inspections. The escort ship commenced tender availability on 6 May. On 1 July 1975, W. Sims was reclassified a frigate and redesignated FF-1059.

On 7 August, W. Sims sailed for the Portsmouth (N.H.) Naval Shipyard for repairs in drydock. She returned to Mayport on 19 September and spent the rest of the year and the first part of 1975 in training and in improving the physical condition of the ship.

On 15 April 1975, the frigate joined in Fleet Exercise "Agate Punch" which involved naval air, surface, subsurface, and land forces. The exercise ended on the 27th, and W. Sims proceeded to the naval weapons station where she offloaded weapons in preparation for going into the shipyard in June.

The ship suffered an engineering casualty on 30 April and was towed to Charleston for repairs. Upon her arrival back at Mayport on 8 May, W. Sims commenced a month-long tender availability. The escort ship got underway on 11 June for Philadelphia for a nine-month overhaul. The ship went into drydock on 21 June and remained there until 8 December; and, after she was refloated, work renewing the ship continued into the spring of 1976.

After tests and sea trials in the Virginia capes area, the ship returned to Mayport on 14 April 1976. From the 23d to the 27th of that month, W. Sims was moored at Port Everglades and then got underway for Andros Island and trials to evaluate new antisubmarine warfare equipment. She next returned to Mayport and conducted operations in the Jacksonville area.

W. Sims arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on 23 May and spent the next five weeks in intensive training. After an operational readiness evaluation and gunfire support qualifications at Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, the ship returned to Mayport on 2 July. Tender availability occupied the month of July and continued into August. After completing several inspections, W. Sims got underway on 2 September for a North Atlantic crossing.

En route, she participated in Operation "Joint Effort," a series of exercises conducted in a task group environment. On 14 September, W. Sims was 700 yards aft of John F. Kennedy (CV-67) when Bordelon (DD-881) collided with that carrier and searched the nearby waters for any men who might have been thrown overboard.

The North Atlantic cruise was divided into four separate operations. "Joint Effort," conducted during the crossing, was a workup phase. "Teamwork 76" was a major NATO exercise involving the forces of the United States, Great Britain, Belgium, Denmark, West Germany, the Netherlands, and Norway. It included a show of strength in the North Cape area. "Baltic Operations" was conducted in the Baltic Sea and was an exercise in fleet steaming in a confined area. "Bonded Item," the final exercise, was an exercise designed around an amphibious assault at Jutland.

On 27 October 1976, W. Sims departed Edinburgh, Scotland; headed home; and arrived at Mayport on 9 November. The ship spent the remainer of 1976 and January 1977 in availability. Shipyard work and underway training occupied February. On I March, a propulsion examining board embarked; and the ship passed in all respects. During the remainder of the month, the escort ship prepared for a.n upcoming deployment.

W. Sims departed Mayport on. 30 March, bound for Lisbon, Portugal, and a six and one-half- month Mediterranean deployment. A severe storm with 20- to 30-foot seas, encountered en route, damaged the main mast to the point where it had to be supported by riggings of mooring lines. As a result, the ship arrived in Rota rather than Lisbon and remained there from 12 April to 13 May undergoing repairs.

The destroyer escort then conducted operations in the areas of Crete, Greece, Tunisia, and Sicily. Sims arrived at Alexandria, Egypt, on 8 August and, during her visit there, was visited by the American consul general, the Governor of Alexandria, and the Commander in Chief of the Egyptian Navy. She then departed for Augusta Bay, Sicily.

"National Week XXIII" began on 15 August and consisted of intensive war games involving both 6th Fleet task groups, - elements of the Italian Navy, and American Air Force planes. The exercise concluded on 22 August when the fleet anchored off Taranto, Italy, for debriefing.

The crew enjoyed a port visit to Palma de Mallorca, Spain, before going to sea for "Bystander" operations near Gibraltar. After a tender availability at Naples, W. Sims joined the NATO Exercise "Display Determination"-already in progress-on 24 September. When the exercise ended, the escort ship acted as the
sole escort for Independence (CV-62) as they visited Malaga and Rota, Spain. On 14 October, W. Sims, along with Independence and several other ships, departed Rota and arrived at Mayport on the 21st.

The ship spent most of November undergoing tender availability and, on the 28th, -participated in Operation "Marcot," a joint operation with the Canadian Navy

On 3 December, while operating near Bermuda, the
ship lost all power due to an engineering failure. The
ship had no power to any equipment except those
powered by batteries. An aircraft responded to dis
tress flares and contacted surface ships in the ar . ea.
Ainsworth (DE-1090) responded and came alongside,
"skin to skin" on the high seas, with all lines tripled.
In the midst of six-foot swells, there began heavy
movement between the two ships causing frequent
contact, buckling several frames in the midships se . c
tion ' and causing considerable superficial damage to
the starboard side. After temporary repairs were
made, all lines were cleared, and W. Sims returned
to home port for repairs. The year 1977 ended with
the destroyer escort in restricted availability, conduct
ing repairs on both diesels and structural repairs to
the starboard side.

W.' S. Sims remained in restricted availability into March 1978. On the 8th, she joined units of the 2d Fleet in the Caribbean for Exercise "Safepass '78." The ship then proceeded north to provide services for Hammerhead (SSN-663). After refueling at New London, Conn., W. Sims arrived back at Mayport on 24 March and began an upkeep period until 6 April.

After successfully iindergoing an operational propulsion plant exam, the frigate got underway for the Caribbean and Exercise "Comptuex;" then headed up the Cooper River to moor at the Charleston Naval Station on 27 April. After onloading weapons, the ship returned to her home port for availability and upkeep which lasted through 5 June.

W. Sims conducted tests and inspections at sea, followed by an inport period from 13 to 28 June during which she completed preparations for the upcoming Mediterranean cruise. On 29 June, the frigate sailed for her fourth and longest Mediterranean cruise. Following her Atlantic crossing, the ship arrived in Malaga on 9 July. After a brief run to Naples, she received on board Admiral H. E. Shear, Commander in Chief, Allied Forces, Southern Europe.

The ship gotunderway on 29 July for Augusta Bay, Sicily, and for operations in the Ionian Sea. "National Week XXV" was held from 23 July to 5 August. Xfter visiting ports in Greece, she participated in "AntiAircraft Warfare Week" and returned to Naples on 21 August. During the last week of August, the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Thomas B. Hayward, paid a visit to tour the ship.

The month of September found W. Sims taking part in Operation "Ocean Missilex" in the eastern Mediterranean; Operation "Display Determination-78," a combined NATO operation; and conducting antisubmarine warfare exercises with a Greek destroyer squadron and an opposing Greek submarine. The end of the month found W. Sims conducting tests with French submarine Daphne and NATO's oceanographic research ship Maria Paola Gee.

Upon returning to La Spezia, Italy, on 2 November 1978, the ship took part in "Antisubmarine Warfare Week" from 7 to 14 November and then underwent intermediate maintenance availability at Cartagena, Spain. The frigate arrived at Toulon, France, on 9 December for a 10-day visit. Sims spent the holiday season from 21 December until the year ended in Alicante, Spain.

Late inVanuary 1979, W. Sims departed Malaga; and she arrived at Mayport in February. She remained at her home port through May preparing for an upcoming shipyard period. After a brief visit to Portland, Maine, W. Sims reported to the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, on 7 May 1979 for an overhaul.

.She was scheduled to return to Mayport in March 1980 and resume operations.


Sims History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Sims was first found in East Lothian, where they held a family seat from very ancient times.

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Early History of the Sims family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sims research. Another 119 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1162, 1503, 1530, and 1596 are included under the topic Early Sims History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Unisex Coat of Arms Hooded Sweatshirt

Sims Spelling Variations

Spelling rules had not yet evolved in medieval Scotland, some names dating from that era often appear many different ways. Some spelling variations of Sims include Simms, Symes, Sime, Simes, Sim, Sym, Syms, Syme and others.

Early Notables of the Sims family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Sims Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Sims family to Ireland

Some of the Sims family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 77 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Sims migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Sims Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Andrew Sims, who landed in Virginia in 1635 [1]
  • Bartholomew Sims, who arrived in Virginia in 1663-1664 [1]
  • Job Sims who settled in Nevis in 1663
  • Samuel Sims, who arrived in Maryland or Virginia in 1672 [1]
  • Eleanor Sims, who landed in Maryland in 1679 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Sims Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Thomas Sims, who landed in Virginia in 1714 [1]
  • Thomas Sims, who arrived in Virginia in 1716 [1]
  • John Sims, who settled in Maryland in 1737
  • William Sims, who settled in Virginia in 1749
  • Joanna Sims, who landed in Virginia in 1750 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Sims Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Charles H Sims, who arrived in Texas in 1835 [1]
  • Henry Sims, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1838 [1]
  • Robert Sims, who arrived in New York in 1838 [1]
  • John Sims, who landed in Mississippi in 1840 [1]
  • Frederick Sims, who landed in Charleston, South Carolina in 1840 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Sims migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Sims Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • John Sims, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • John Sims, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Robert Sims, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Fardinando Sims, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Fred Sims, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Sims migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Sims Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Daniel Sims, English convict who was convicted in Surrey, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 16th January 1816, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[2]
  • Ebenezer Sims, a bricklayer, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Mr. William Sims, English convict who was convicted in Dorset, England for life, transported aboard the "Burrell" on 22nd July 1830, arriving in New South Wales[3]
  • Mr. George Maurice Sims, (b. 1815), aged 18, English convict who was convicted in Wiltshire, England for 14 years for theft, transported aboard the "Aurora" on 3rd November 1833, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, he died in 1911 [4]
  • Mr. John Sims, British Convict who was convicted in London, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Asia" on 20th July 1837, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Sims migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Sims Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • James Sims, aged 39, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • Margaret Sims, aged 36, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • James Sims, aged 17, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • Margaret Sims, aged 14, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • John Sims, aged 11, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Sims (post 1700) +

  • Christopher Albert "Chris" Sims (b. 1942), American econometrician and macroeconomist, recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (2011)
  • Chloe Linda Daisy Margaret Sims (b. 1981), English television personality known for appearing in the ITVBe reality series The Only Way Is Essex
  • Jena Michelle Sims (b. 1988), American actress, known for B movies like Attack of the 50 Foot Cheerleader (2012), 3-Headed Shark Attack (2015) and Sharknado 5: Global Swarming (2017), Miss Georgia Teen USA in 2007
  • Jocko Sims (b. 1981), American actor, best known for playing Anthony Adams in Crash and later playing Carlton Burk in the series The Last Ship
  • Bill Sims Jr. (1949-2019), American blues musician
  • John Sims (1749-1831), English botanist and physician, son of R. C. Sims, M.D., a member of the Society of Friends, who for sixty years practised at Dunmow, Essex
  • James Sims (1741-1820), Irish physician, son of a dissenting minister, born in co. Down
  • David Nigel Sims (1931-2018), English footballer who played as a goalkeeper from the 1940s through 1967
  • Scott Sims DVM (1955-2015), American veterinarian and television personality
  • William Sowden Sims (1858-1936), American admiral in the United States Navy, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for History (1921), eponym of the USS Sims (DD-409), USS Sims (DE-153), USS W. S. Sims (DE-1059) and the USS Admiral W. S. Sims (AP-127)
  • . (Another 13 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Sims family +

HMS Hood
  • Mr. William Sims (b. 1920), English Engine Room Artificer 4th Class serving for the Royal Navy from Chobham, Surrey, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [6]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Frank G. Sims, British Leading Supply Assistant with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he survived the sinking [7]

Related Stories +

The Sims Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fortuna et labore
Motto Translation: By fortune and labor.


Our Introduction to the Knox-Class Frigates in the 1970s

This paper discuses life on USS Knox-class frigates in the 1970s. It is a follow on to a previous article entitled “Post World War II Destroyer Escorts.” Much of the information was obtained by my personal experiences aboard ships of the class which include:

  • Commissioning Executive Officer USS Blakely (DE 1072)
  • Officer in Charge, Fleet Introduction Team, Avondale, Westwego, Louisiana
  • Commissioning Commanding Officer, USS Moinester (DE 1097) – The last ship of the class
  • Numerous inspections of ships of the class as a member of the LANTFLT Propulsion Examining Board and Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV)

Captain Charles T. Creekman, Executive Director of the Naval Historical Foundation, served under me as weapons officer on the commissioning crew of the USS Moinester and later had command of the Knox-class frigate USS W.S. SIMS (FF 1059).

USS W. S. Sims (DE 1059), post-1980 hull refit (NAVSOURCE)

A list of the major ship characteristics follows:

  • Length – 438 ft.
  • Beam – 46 ft. 9 in
  • Draft – 24 ft. 9 in
  • Full Load Displacement – 4260 tons
  • Propulsion – Steam turbine – Single Screw – 35,000 SHP
  • Boilers – two 1200 psi D type
  • Sustained Speed – 27 knots
  • Complement – 17 officers, 240 enlisted
  • The ships were fitted with fin stabilizers.
  • Radar – AN/SPS 10 Surface Search, AN/SPS 40 Air Search
  • Sonar – AN/SQS 26 Bow Mounted, AN/ SQS 35 Variable Depth Sonar (VDS), augmented with AN/ SQR 18 Tactical Towed Array System on the 35 ships of the class that had VDS installed.
  • Aircraft – One SH-2 Seasprite Mk1 LAMPS (Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System) helicopter
  • Armament
    • One MK 42 5”/54 caliber gun mount
    • Anti-submarine rockets (ASROC) & Harpoon anti-ship missiles fired from an 8 cell ASROC launcher located on the forecastle aft of the gun mount
    • Mk 46 torpedoes in two dual tube launchers located amidships
    • Sea Sparrow Basic Point Defense Missile System (BPDMS) on the fantail of 31 ships of the class, later replaced by Phalanx Close In Weapons System (CIWS). installed aboard all 46 ships of the class.

    The VDS and TACTAS were located in a compartment in the stern of the vessel. Their streaming access through stern doors and the CIWS, flight deck, and helicopter hangar can be clearly seen in the following photo:

    1 September 1988: Off Hampton Roads, Va. – A stern view of Aylwin underway as it leaves Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia. (U.S. Navy photo DVID #DN-SN-90-06084 from the DVIC)

    The electrical plant consisted of three 750 kW steam driven turbo-generators located side by side in Auxiliary Room #1. There was also a 750 kW diesel generator located in the after part of the ship which could be used as either a ship service or emergency generator. It was driven by a pair of diesel engines in tandem, one forward and one aft of the generator.

    All major machinery plant control functions were performed from air conditioned control rooms. One of these that was located adjacent to the Auxiliary Room was called “Electrical Central”. The main switchboards were located in this space. There were also air conditioned control rooms located on the upper levels of the fire room and engine room.

    The ships were fitted with Prairie Masker noise reduction systems in order to minimize the noise transmitted from their machinery to the water and thereby reduce their detectability by submarines. The system consisted of a compressor that delivered high volumes of low pressure air at approximately 25 psi to four vertical belts along the underwater hull where it was discharged to the water through perforations in order to dampen out transmitted noise. The air was also supplied to perforations in the propeller trailing edges by way of a passage in the shafting for the same purpose. These systems proved to be very effective in service.

    The keel for the lead ship of the class, USS Knox (DE 1052), was laid in October 1965 and the ship was commissioned on 12 April 1969. The first 25 ships of the class (DE 1052-1077) were built in four different shipyards. However the remaining 21 ships (DE 1078- 1097) were all built in a production line at Avondale Shipyard, near New Orleans, LA in order to save costs. The last ship of the class, USS Moinester (DE 1097) was commissioned in 1974. All of the ships had been decommissioned by 1994. However 31 ships of the class were sold or leased to foreign navies where some are still in service.

    At Avondale the ships were built side by side in a production line which consisted of five building ways. The keel was laid on the inboard side of the line and the hulls were gradually moved sideways through the various positions culminating in a side launch into the Mississippi River as shown in the following photo:

    21 October 1972: Westwego, La. – The USS Capodanno (DE 1093) is side launched at the Main Yard of Avondale Shipyards (NAVSOURCE)

    Next I will discuss my own personal experiences with the Knox class frigates. As previously discussed, they included three back to back tours between 1970 and 1976 as well as a number of ship inspections.

    In early 1970 I received orders to be the commissioning executive officer of the USS Blakely (DE 1072), a Knox-class DE that was under construction at Avondale. The ship was scheduled to be home ported in Charleston, South Carolina. It would be delivered to the navy in June 1970 and commissioned in July. At that time we had been stationed in California for the previous 5 years. My family and I drove across country to our destination which was actually in Newport, Rhode Island. I proceeded to report in to the Fleet Training Center in Newport for duty on the pre commissioning crew in April 1970. The prospective commanding officer, chief engineer, weapons, and supply officer along with about 20 senior crew members would form what was referred to as the “nucleus crew” at the shipyard where they would oversee the last stages of construction and become familiar with their ship. My job was to assemble and organize what was called the “balance crew” consisting of about 200 personnel in Newport. I was assisted by the prospective operations officer. I had never met my new CO, but it was important that we establish contact and keep him informed as to what was going on throughout the pre commissioning period which proved to be relatively uneventful and soon it was time to relocate to Charleston. So we packed up the car and headed south. Shortly after arrival we found a home for rent in a development west of the Ashley River. It took some time for us to get used to the high heat and humidity. But Charleston proved to be a very pleasant place to live.

    In 1970 there was plenty of military presence in the town. This was primarily due to the fact that Representative Mendel Rivers was the Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee. A large air force base was co-located with the commercial airport and new C-5A cargo transports could often be seen overhead. The Charleston Naval Base was located just up river from the city on the Cooper River. Just up river from the base was the Charleston Naval Shipyard and further up river in Goose Creek was a Naval Weapons Stations where Polaris Missiles were stored. The naval base was home to the Atlantic Fleet Mine Force, as well as a number of destroyers, frigates, and submarines. My last previous visit to Charleston had been in 1959 when I attended minesweeping school.

    I found temporary office space in the Naval Shipyard immediately adjacent to the old building ways where my old Massachusetts Maritime Academy (MMA) school ship, the USS Charleston was built in 1935. It turned out that there was a large model of the Charleston right outside the shipyard commander’s office. It has since been relocated to MMA where it remains on display.

    Blakely was due to arrive at the shipyard on 2 July. Since the ship would not be turned over to the Navy until after arrival, it was operated by the builder’s trial crew on the delivery trip. Their practice was to make the transit from the Gulf of Mexico at a speed of over 25 knots. An unfortunate incident occurred during the trip when the ship ran down a sailboat off the Coast of Florida. Fortunately there were no fatalities. However the boat was a total loss. When Blakely hove in sight coming up the river, the jack staff was bent over in a U shape and there were scars remaining on the bow. But nevertheless it was an inspiring sight and my crew was very excited about going aboard and taking charge of a brand new ship. After the ship docked, I went up the gangway. My new CO Commander Frank Carelli was waiting on the quarterdeck.

    The commissioning ceremony was held on18 July 1970. The sponsor who had christened the ship was the granddaughter of Vice Admiral Charles Blakely for whom the ship was named . The principal speaker was Rear Admiral James Holloway, who in 1974 would become the Chief of Naval Operations. Upon completion of the commissioning ceremony we entered the Charleston Naval Shipyard for an 8 week Fitting Out Availability (FOA).

    A photo of Blakely while underway follows:

    1 February 1991: At sea – A port beam view of Blakely underway underway off the coast of Newport, R.I. (U.S. Navy photo DVID #DN-ST-91-05242 from the DVIC)

    Shakedown training for a ship of this type was normally four weeks long. You were allowed one port visit on a weekend mid way through the training cycle. We chose Port au Prince, Haiti. I had been there once before in 1955 during an MMA training cruise. Haiti has some wonderful scenery and, if properly developed, it could have become a major tourist destination. But it has always been hindered by bad government and abysmal poverty. The training period ended without incident. We though that we would be going to Vieques Island near Puerto Rico for live shore bombardment qualifications next. But, much to our chagrin, we had failed to file the necessary messages, so we had to head back to Charleston. Enroute we passed close to San Salvador Island, where Columbus first set foot in the New World.

    The next hurdle was to go through Final Contract Trial (FCT) with the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV Board). From there we were scheduled to enter the Charleston Naval Shipyard for a three month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA). Then came the bad news. The PSA would be at least six months in length for two reasons. 1. Installation of a new Basic Point Defense Missile System (BPDMS), 2. Over 100 high pressure steam system welds had to be redone. This was to cause us a lot of frustration. None of us wanted to spend the bulk of our tour in the shipyard. But we had no choice. While we were in the shipyard we underwent a conversion from Navy Special Fuel Oil (NSFO) marine distillate fuel (DFM). At the time, this conversion was happening throughout the fleet.

    I was selected for the grade of Commander. That was a big relief. We felt like we were home free at that point. But a lot more was to happen during the remainder of my naval career.

    We were due to go to sea to work out the bugs in our new BPDMS system. We also intended to complete our naval gunfire support qualification, this time at Culebra which was part of the Vieques Naval Gun Fire Support (NGFS) complex.

    I was due for rotation in September 1971. Prior to going out to sea, I contacted my detailer. He informed me that my new assignment would be as Officer in Charge of something called a Fleet Introduction Team (FIT) at the Avondale Shipyard. Prior to going out to sea, He informed me that my new assignment would be as Officer in Charge of something called a Fleet Introduction Team (FIT) at the Avondale Shipyard where Blakely had been built. The FIT team’s purpose would be to guide the nucleus crews of the Knox-class frigates that were under construction at the shipyard through the pre-commissioning process. He gave me a contact at OPNAV in Washington that he indicated could provide me with more information on the assignment. That individual said that he would mail me a copy of my new charter. In the process, he informed me that when they had set up the working group that established the FIT team, they had specified that the Officer in Charge would get command of the last ship in the program. That sounded interesting to me.

    Blakely was scheduled to go on a Northern European Cruise in September 1971. But I would miss out on that. On our return to Charleston after our stint at Culebra, my relief was waiting for us on the pier. Blakely would serve for another twenty years before being decommissioned in 1991 and scrapped in 2000.

    Further adventures with the Knox-class frigates will be described in a subsequent article.

    George W. Stewart is a retired US Navy Captain. He is a 1956 graduate of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. During his 30 year naval career, he held two ship commands and served a total of 8 years on naval material inspection boards, during which he conducted trials and inspections aboard over 200 naval vessels. Since his retirement from active naval service in 1986 he has been employed in the ship design industry where he has specialized in the development of concept designs of propulsion and powering systems, some of which have entered active service. He currently holds the title of Chief Marine Engineer at Marine Design Dynamics.


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    Product Description

    USS W S Sims FF 1059

    "Personalized" Canvas Ship Print

    (Not just a photo or poster but a work of art!)

    Every sailor loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older his appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience gets stronger. A personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. It shows your pride even if a loved one is no longer with you. Every time you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart (guaranteed) .

    The image is portrayed on the waters of the ocean or bay with a display of her crest if available. The ships name is printed on the bottom of the print. What a great canvas print to commemorate yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her.

    The printed picture is exactly as you see it. The canvas size is 8"x10" ready for framing as it is or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing. If you would like a larger picture size (11"x 14") on a 13" X 19" canvas simply purchase this print then prior to payment purchase additional services located in the store category (Home) to the left of this page. This option is an additional $12.00. The prints are made to order. They look awesome when matted and framed.

    We PERSONALIZE the print with "Name, Rank and/or Years Served" or anything else you would like it to state (NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE). It is placed just above the ships photo. After purchasing the print simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed on it. Example:

    United States Navy Sailor
    YOUR NAME HERE
    Proudly Served Sept 1963 - Sept 1967

    This would make a nice gift and a great addition to any historic military collection. Would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

    The watermark "Great Naval Images" will NOT be on your print.

    This photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high resolution printer and should last many years.

    Because of its unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. The canvas print does not need glass thereby enhancing the appearance of your print, eliminating glare and reducing your overall cost.

    We guarantee you will not be disappointed with this item or your money back. In addition, We will replace the canvas print unconditionally for FREE if you damage your print. You would only be charged a nominal fee plus shipping and handling.

    Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased these prints have been very satisfied.

    Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

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    Following an extended fitting-out period at the Charleston Naval Shipyard and a restricted availability at Jacksonville Shipyard for correction of minor construction faults, W. S. Sims became fully operational in June 1970 and proceeded to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for shakedown training. After a two and one-half month post-shakedown availability at the Charleston Naval Shipyard to correct deficiencies uncovered during shakedown and to install additional equipment, W. S. Sims put to sea in November to evaluate the feasibility of installing the Light airborne multi-purpose system (LAMPS). She was the first ship of her class to have a manned helicopter land on her deck and, during the next four days, she successfully demonstrated the capability of these new ships to operate manned helicopters. Upon completion of the testing, the escort proceeded to her home port, Mayport, Florida, for the holiday season.

    On 11 January 1971, W. S. Sims left Mayport with personnel from the Key West Testing and Evaluation Detachment embarked. The project consisted of six cruises, numbered 0 to 5, where W. S. Sims operated with various types of submarines in order to determine the capabilities and limitations of the installed long range underwater sound detection equipment. The tests continued throughout the year and took the escort to such ports as New Orleans Fredriksted, St. Croix San Juan, Puerto Rico and Nassau, Bahamas.

    The ship returned to Mayport in time for Thanksgiving and, between 22 November and 31 December 1971, was involved in a fleet standdown period during which officials representing the squadron, flotilla, and type commanders conducted a series of inspections.

    The final cruise for the Key West testing project began on 4 January 1972. W. S. Sims returned to Mayport on 15 January and spent the next month preparing for operations with the 6th Fleet.

    On 15 February 1972, the ocean escort sailed for the Caribbean to participate in "LantFltRedEx 2-72" and then proceeded on to the Mediterranean. On 10 March, W. S. Sims inchopped to the 6th Fleet and took part in various antisubmarine exercises besides visiting Barcelona, Spain, and Naples, Italy. From 27 March to 6 April, the destroyer escort and William V. Pratt maintained a close surveillance of Soviet naval units in the south central Mediterranean.

    W. S. Sims visited Gaeta, Italy, and Golfe Juan, France, before taking part in Operation "Quickdraw", a combined United States and Italian naval exercise held on 17 April. A visit to Sanremo, Italy, and tender availability at Naples followed the exercise.

    On 8 May 1972, the ship joined in a combined naval exercise, Operation "Dawn Patrol", with British, French, and Italian warships. After visiting Sfax, Tunisia, W. S. Sims conducted special surveillance operations on Soviet submarines from 23 May to 10 June. The ship then participated in Operation "Good Friendship" with the Turkish Navy and a second Operation "Quick Draw" with the Italian Navy. During August, the crew enjoyed leave at Sanremo, Italy Barcelona, Spain and Theoule, France. When Vreeland relieved W. S. Sims late that month, the latter headed home and returned to Mayport on 5 September.

    Upon completing a month-long standdown period, the ship commenced an extended availability at the Jacksonville Shipyards, Jacksonville, Florida, which lasted through the end of the year and the first three months of 1973. The ship then carried out post-availability sea trials. The discrepancies which the testing uncovered were corrected by 9 April. The following day, the ocean escort steamed south to Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, and joined the surface missile fleet in gunfire support exercises conducted at the Atlantic Fleet weapons range, Culebra Island.

    On 8 May 1973, W. S. Sims arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for refresher training, but an engineering casualty soon forced her to return to Mayport for repairs. When the corrections had been made, she returned to Cuba and conducted refresher training from the end of May to mid-June. Upon returning to Mayport, the ship executed a LAMPS workup from 17 June to 9 July.

    From 12 to 26 July, W. S. Sims participated in "LantRedEx 1-74" in the Caribbean. As her next assignment, the ship evaluated the basic point defense missile. The ocean escort returned to her home port on 10 August, enabling the crew to enjoy a period of leave and liberty.

    W. S. Sims sailed for North Atlantic and Mediterranean operations on 14 September. Upon arrival, the ship held a LAMPS demonstration for the Royal Netherlands Navy in Amsterdam. At the time of W. S. Sims' inchop to the 6th Fleet, the Middle East was in a state of war. For the first month and one-half, the ocean escort's duties involved operations in support of United States interests in the Middle East crisis. From 26 to 30 November, W. S. Sims guarded the King of Morocco embarked on the French luxury liner Roussilion en route to the Arab oil conference held in Algiers, Algeria. The King, as a gesture of gratitude, sent the officers and men a gift of three tons of oranges, tangerines, sardines, and orange juice. After visiting Naples, Italy, and Rota, Spain, W. S. Sims spent the 1973 holiday season at Valencia, Spain.

    On 4 January 1974, W. S. Sims stood out of Valencia harbor to operate with Independence. After a visit to Rota and exercises with America, the escort ship participated in a search for survivors of a small British trawler and four of six missing sailors were recovered. On 25 January, she proceeded via Gibraltar to Casablanca, Morocco, where she arrived on 1 February. The following day, the Soviet military attache came on board for a special tour of the ship. After brief stops at Rota and at Bermuda, W. S. Sims arrived at Mayport on 14 February.

    1975–1980

    During March and April, the ship took part in interim-sea-control ship-evaluation operations in waters between Jacksonville and Charleston. She returned to her home port on 27 April and underwent various inspections. The escort ship commenced tender availability on 6 May. On 1 July 1975, W. S. Sims was reclassified a frigate and redesignated FF-1059.

    On 7 August, W. S. Sims sailed for the Portsmouth (New Hamshire) Naval Shipyard for repairs in drydock. She returned to Mayport on 19 September and spent the rest of the year and the first part of 1975 in training and in improving the physical condition of the ship.

    On 15 April 1975, the frigate joined in Fleet Exercise "Agate Punch" which involved naval air, surface, subsurface, and land forces. The exercise ended on the 27th, and W. S. Sims proceeded to the naval weapons station where she offloaded weapons in preparation for going into the shipyard in June.

    The ship suffered an engineering casualty on 30 April and was towed to Charleston for repairs. Upon her arrival back at Mayport on 8 May, W. S. Sims commenced a month-long tender availability. The escort ship got underway on 11 June for Philadelphia for a nine-month overhaul. The ship went into drydock on 21 June and remained there until 8 December and, after she was refloated, work renewing the ship continued into the spring of 1976.

    After tests and sea trials in the Virginia capes area, the ship returned to Mayport on 14 April 1976. From the 23d to the 27th of that month, W. S. Sims was moored at Port Everglades and then got underway for Andros Island and trials to evaluate new antisubmarine warfare equipment. She next returned to Mayport and conducted operations in the Jacksonville area.

    W. S. Sims arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on 23 May and spent the next five weeks in intensive training. After an operational readiness evaluation and gunfire support qualifications at Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, the ship returned to Mayport on 2 July. Tender availability occupied the month of July and continued into August. After completing several inspections, W. S. Sims got underway on 2 September for a North Atlantic crossing.

    En route, she participated in Operation "Joint Effort", a series of exercises conducted in a task group environment. On 14 September, W. S. Sims was 700 yards (600 m) aft of John F. Kennedy when Bordelon collided with that carrier and searched the nearby waters for any men who might have been thrown overboard.

    The North Atlantic cruise was divided into four separate operations. "Joint Effort", conducted during the crossing, was a workup phase. "Teamwork 76" was a major NATO exercise involving the forces of the United States, Great Britain, Belgium, Denmark, West Germany, the Netherlands, and Norway. It included a show of strength in the North Cape area. "Baltic Operations" was conducted in the Baltic Sea and was an exercise in fleet steaming in a confined area. "Bonded Item", the final exercise, was an exercise designed around an amphibious assault at Jutland.

    On 27 October 1976, W. S. Sims departed Edinburgh, Scotland headed home and arrived at Mayport on 9 November. The ship spent the remainder of 1976 and January 1977 in availability. Shipyard work and underway training occupied February. On 1 March, a propulsion examining board embarked and the ship passed in all respects. During the remainder of the month, the escort ship prepared for an upcoming deployment.

    W. S. Sims departed Mayport on 30 March, bound for Lisbon, Portugal, and a six and one-half month Mediterranean deployment. A severe storm with 20- to 30-foot (9 m) seas, encountered en route, damaged the main mast to the point where it had to be supported by riggings of mooring lines. As a result, the ship arrived in Rota rather than Lisbon and remained there from 12 April to 13 May undergoing repairs.

    The destroyer escort then conducted operations in the areas of Crete, Greece, Tunisia, and Sicily. W. S. Sims arrived at Alexandria, Egypt, on 8 August and, during her visit there, was visited by the American consul general, the Governor of Alexandria, and the Commander in Chief of the Egyptian Navy. She then departed for Augusta Bay, Sicily.

    "National Week XXIII" began on 15 August and consisted of intensive war games involving both 6th Fleet task groups, elements of the Italian Navy, and American Air Force planes. The exercise concluded on 22 August when the fleet anchored off Taranto, Italy, for debriefing.

    The crew enjoyed a port visit to Palma de Mallorca, Spain, before going to sea for "Bystander" operations near Gibraltar. After a tender availability at Naples, W. S. Sims joined the NATO Exercise "Display Determination"—already in progress—on 24 September. When the exercise ended, the escort ship acted as the sole escort for Independence as they visited Malaga and Rota, Spain. On 14 October, W. S. Sims, along with Independence and several other ships, departed Rota and arrived at Mayport on the 21st.

    The ship spent most of November undergoing tender availability and, on the 28th, participated in Operation "Marcot", a joint operation with the Canadian Navy.

    On 3 December, while operating near Bermuda, the ship lost all power due to an engineering failure. The ship had no power to any equipment except those powered by batteries. An aircraft responded to distress flares and contacted surface ships in the area. USS Ainsworth responded and came alongside, "skin to skin" on the high seas, with all lines tripled. In the midst of six-foot swells, there began heavy movement between the two ships causing frequent contact, buckling several frames in the midships section, and causing considerable superficial damage to the starboard side. After temporary repairs were made, all lines were cleared, and W. S. Sims returned to home port for repairs. The year 1977 ended with the destroyer escort in restricted availability, conducting repairs on both diesels and structural repairs to the starboard side.

    W. S. Sims remained in restricted availability into March 1978. On the 8th, she joined units of the 2d Fleet in the Caribbean for Exercise "Safepass "78". The ship then proceeded north to provide services for Hammerhead. After refueling at New London, Connecticut, W. S. Sims arrived back at Mayport on 24 March and began an upkeep period until 6 April.

    After successfully undergoing an operational propulsion plant exam, the frigate got underway for the Caribbean and Exercise "Comptuex" then headed up the Cooper River to moor at the Charleston Naval Station on 27 April. After onloading weapons, the ship returned to her home port for availability and upkeep which lasted through 5 June.

    W. S. Sims conducted tests and inspections at sea, followed by an in port period from 13 to 28 June during which she completed preparations for the upcoming Mediterranean cruise. On 29 June, the frigate sailed for her fourth and longest Mediterranean cruise. Following her Atlantic crossing, the ship arrived in Malaga on 9 July. After a brief run to Naples, she received on board Admiral H. E. Shear, Commander in Chief, Allied Forces, Southern Europe.

    The ship got underway on 29 July for Augusta Bay, Sicily, and for operations in the Ionian Sea. "National Week XXV" was held from 23 July to 5 August. After visiting ports in Greece, she participated in "Anti-Aircraft Warfare Week" and returned to Naples on 21 August. During the last week of August, the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Thomas B. Hayward, paid a visit to tour the ship.

    The month of September found W. S. Sims taking part in Operation "Ocean Missilex" in the eastern Mediterranean Operation "Display Determination-78", a combined NATO operation and conducting antisubmarine warfare exercises with a Greek destroyer squadron and an opposing Greek submarine. The end of the month found W. S. Sims conducting tests with French submarine Daphne and NATO's oceanographic research ship Maria Paola Gee.

    Upon returning to La Spezia, Italy, on 2 November 1978, the ship took part in "Antisubmarine Warfare Week" from 7 to 14 November and then underwent intermediate maintenance availability at Cartagena, Spain. The frigate arrived at Toulon, France, on 9 December for a 10-day visit. W. S. Sims spent the holiday season from 21 December until the year ended in Alicante, Spain.

    Late in January 1979, W. S. Sims departed Malaga and she arrived at Mayport in February. She remained at her home port through May preparing for an upcoming shipyard period. After a brief visit to Portland, Maine, W. S. Sims reported to the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, on 7 May 1979 for an overhaul.

    She was scheduled to return to Mayport in March 1980 and resume operations.


    Distinguished Sailors Saluted On Stamps

    WASHINGTON , Feb. 4 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Four revered U.S. Navy icons were commemorated with a First-Class salute with the dedication of the Distinguished Sailors collectable stamps. Available nationwide today, the 44-cent stamps immortalize four sailors who served with bravery and distinction during the 20th Century: William S. Sims , Arleigh A. Burke , John McCloy and Doris "Dorie" Miller.

    The dedication ceremony took place today at the United States Navy Memorial in Washington, DC .

    "On behalf of the U.S. Postal Service, I am pleased to honor these four great sailors who impacted our nation and world," said Potter. "These brave individuals represent the U.S. Navy 's proud legacy of service to this nation. Their example is an inspiration to every American."

    Joining Potter in dedicating the stamps were Juan M. Garcia III , Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) Vice Admiral Samuel J. Locklear III , Director, Navy Staff Edward K. Walker Jr. , Rear Admiral, Supply Corps (Ret.) and United States Navy Memorial President David A. Rosenberg , PhD, Naval Historian/Captain, U.S. Navy Reserves Rep. Chet Edwards (D-TX) Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) and, U.S. Postal Service Vice President, Supply Management, Susan M. Brownell .

    "I am honored to recognize the contributions these great Americans made to our Navy and to our country," said Garcia. "It is only fitting that their legacy of honor, courage and commitment be spotlighted by the United States Postal Service."

    The stamps, designed by Phil Jordan of Falls Church, VA , are based on photographs from Navy archives. Text along the top of the stamp sheet identifies the four sailors, the approximate date of each photograph, and a ship named in honor of each sailor.

    Commander of U.S. naval forces in European waters during World War I, Sims (1858-1936) was an outspoken reformer and innovator who helped shape the Navy into a modern fighting force. Frustrated by the Navy bureaucracy, he circumvented his superiors to get the Navy to adopt improved gunfire techniques that increased firing accuracy as ships rolled through ocean swells. He also is noted for promoting the convoy system that grouped ships closely together as they were accompanied by small numbers of Navy escorts while crossing the U-Boat infested Atlantic — saving countless lives in both world wars. The stamp features a detail from a 1919 photograph of Sims and depicts the crest of the destroyer escort USS W.S. Sims (DE-1059), commissioned in 1970.

    After serving as one of the top destroyer squadron commanders of World War II, Burke (1901-1996) had an equally distinguished postwar career in which he played a major role in modernizing the Navy and guiding its response to the Cold War. During World War II, he gained a reputation for brilliance and innovation while commanding Destroyer Squadron 23, known as "the Little Beavers." The squadron fought in 22 separate actions in a four-month period, sinking or helping to sink nine enemy destroyers and downing 30 airplanes. He later served an unprecedented three terms as the Navy 's highest ranking officer — Chief of Naval Operations — to speed construction of nuclear-powered submarines and initiating the Polaris Ballistic Missile Program. His stamp, based on a 1951 photograph, depicts the crest of the guided missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51), commissioned in 1991.

    Described by a shipmate as "like a bull" who couldn't be stopped, McCloy (1876-1945) holds the distinction of being one of the few men in the nation's history to earn two Medals of Honor for a rescue mission during the Boxer Rebellion in which he was wounded, and during the 1914 Mexican Revolt for intentionally exposing his boat to draw enemy fire to identify their positions for retaliation by U.S. cruiser gunfire. Shot in the thigh, he remained on post 48 hours until the brigade surgeon sent him to a hospital. In 1919 he was awarded the Navy Cross as commander of USS Curlew, which engaged in the "difficult and hazardous duty" of sweeping mines in the North Sea in the aftermath of World War I. His stamp is based on a circa 1920 photograph and depicts the crest of the destroyer escort, USS McCloy (DE-1038), commissioned in 1963.

    The first black American hero of World War II, Miller (1919-1943) became an inspiration to generations of Americans for his actions at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941 . Serving aboard the battleship West Virginia as a mess attendant — the only job rating open to blacks at the time — Miller helped rescue scores of shipmates wounded or trapped in wreckage. He was later ordered to the bridge to help move the ship's mortally wounded captain. Never trained in its operation, he manned an unattended 50-caliber machine gun to fire on Japanese aircraft until ordered to abandon the bridge as fires raged out of control. He was later awarded the Navy Cross. Miller was promoted in June 1943 to Officer's Cook Third Class aboard the new escort aircraft carrier Liscome Bay and was killed in action on Nov. 24 that year along with more than 600 shipmates when an enemy torpedo sank the ship during the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. His body was lost at sea. His stamp is based on a 1942 photograph and depicts the crest of the destroyer escort USS Miller (DE-1091), commissioned in 1973. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr., portrayed Miller in the 2001 movie Pearl Harbor .

    A self-supporting government enterprise, the U.S. Postal Service is the only delivery service that reaches every address in the nation, 150 million residences, businesses and Post Office Boxes. The Postal Service receives no tax dollars. With 36,000 retail locations and the most frequently visited website in the federal government, the Postal Service relies on the sale of postage, products and services to pay for operating expenses. Named the Most Trusted Government Agency five consecutive years and the third Most Trusted Business in the nation by the Ponemon Institute, the Postal Service has annual revenue of more than $68 billion and delivers nearly half the world's mail. If it were a private sector company, the U.S. Postal Service would rank 28th in the 2009 Fortune 500.

    How to Order the First-Day-of-Issue Postmark

    Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at their local Post Office, at The Postal Store at www.usps.com/shop, or by calling 800-STAMP-24. They should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address the envelopes to themselves or others, and place them in a larger envelope addressed to:

    Distinguished Sailors Stamps

    After applying the first-day-of-issue postmark, the Postal Service will return the envelopes through the mail. There is no charge for the postmark. All orders must be postmarked by April 6, 2010 .

    How to Order First-Day Covers

    Stamp Fulfillment Services also offers first day covers for new stamp issues and Postal Service stationery items postmarked with the official first-day-of-issue cancellation. Each item has an individual catalog number and is offered in the quarterly USA Philatelic catalog. Customers may request a free catalog by calling 800-STAMP-24 or by writing to:

    There are four philatelic products available for this stamp issue:

    • 465863, First-Day Cover/Set 4, $3.28
    • 465868, Digital Color Postmark/Set 4, $6
    • 465891, Ceremony Program, $6.95
    • 465899, Digital Color Postmark/Set 4 w/Full Pane Keepsake, $14.95

    Commander of U.S. naval forces in European waters during World War I, Sims was an outspoken reformer and innovator who helped shape the Navy into a modern fighting force.

    Sims was born in Port Hope, Ontario, Canada , where his father, an American citizen, was a railroad engineer. The family moved to Vermont when Sims was about 12 and soon settled in Pennsylvania .

    Sims attended the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD , from 1876 to 1880. He then spent nearly two decades at sea, interrupted by a year (1889) in Paris studying French. From 1897 to 1900, he served as naval attaché to the U.S. Embassy in France and to the ministry in Russia . During this time, he studied and made reports on European naval developments, which he found to be far more advanced than those in America. While in France , he met his future wife, Anne Hitchcock , daughter of the U.S. minister to Russia .

    In 1901, at great risk to his career, Sims circumvented his immediate superiors and wrote directly to President Theodore Roosevelt about "the extreme danger of the present very inefficient condition of the Navy ," emphasizing the glaring deficiencies of American battleships and the need for more accurate firepower. Roosevelt thanked Sims for the letter and encouraged him to continue offering suggestions. Sims was able to implement some of his ideas for reform, especially in the area of gunnery, while serving as inspector of target practice in the Navy 's Bureau of Navigation from 1902 to 1909. He trained officers and gun crews in a new gun control method called "continuous aim firing," adapting the techniques of British officer Percy Scott and achieving significant improvements in firing speed and accuracy. He also served as President Roosevelt's naval aide from 1907 to 1909.

    Shortly before the United States entered World War I, Sims, by this time a rear admiral, was sent on a secret mission to gather information on wartime conditions and to confer with the British Royal Navy. Soon after America entered the war, he was appointed commander of U.S. naval forces operating near Europe . To counter the German strategy of unrestricted warfare by U-boats, Sims advocated various anti-submarine measures. He played a critical role in promoting and coordinating a system of convoys — using destroyers and other warships to escort merchant ships and transports through danger zones — that achieved dramatic reductions in Allied shipping losses. To the extent that the defeat of German submarine warfare was "the critical naval campaign of the war, essential to victory over the Central Powers," as historian David Trask has written, Sims's contribution to the Allied victory in World War I was profound.

    After the war, Sims returned to the same position he had held previously at the Naval War College , serving as president until his retirement in 1922. He sparked a congressional investigation in 1920 of the wartime conduct of the Navy Department, leading to extensive hearings on the subject. He also wrote a Pulitzer Prize-winning book about the war, Victory at Sea (1920).

    Sims continued to write and lecture about naval reform until his death in 1936, at which time the New York Herald Tribune declared that he had "influenced our naval course more than any man who ever wore the uniform." The Navy has named three destroyers after Sims. The most recent, USS W.S. Sims (DE-1059), was commissioned in 1970.

    After serving as one of the top destroyer squadron commanders of World War II, Burke had an equally distinguished postwar career in which he played a major role in modernizing the Navy and guiding its response to the Cold War.

    Born and raised on a farm near Boulder, CO , Burke secured an appointment to the Naval Academy in 1919 and graduated in 1923. After serving five years on the battleship USS Arizona, he pursued postgraduate work in ordnance at the United States Naval Postgraduate School and then earned a master's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1931. During the 1930s, Burke served in various capacities in a heavy cruiser and a destroyer before being given command of USS Mugford, which under Burke won the Destroyer Gunnery Trophy for 1939-1940.

    At the outset of World War II, Burke was an inspector at the Naval Gun Factory in Washington, DC . His repeated requests for sea duty went unheeded until he was given command in early 1943 of a destroyer division in the South Pacific. He soon gained a reputation for brilliance and innovation, especially after taking command that fall of Destroyer Squadron 23. Under Burke the squadron became known as "the Little Beavers" and fought in 22 separate actions in a four-month period, sinking or helping to sink nine Japanese destroyers and downing 30 airplanes. His exploits and his own nickname, "31-Knot Burke," became widely known, and his performance in battle earned him an appointment in March 1944 as chief of staff to Vice Admiral Marc Mitscher in the famed Fast Carrier Task Force. According to the Dictionary of American Military Biography, in this post Burke "coordinated the operations of the largest naval striking force in history in the battles of the Philippine Sea, Leyte Gulf and Okinawa ."

    With the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, Burke was sent to Japan to serve as deputy chief of staff to the commander of U.S. naval forces in the Far East. In 1951, he briefly served as commander of Cruiser Division Five before being designated a member of the United Nations Truce Delegation, which sought to negotiate an armistice in Korea. In late 1951, Burke was summoned to Washington, DC , for a two-year tour as director of the Navy 's Strategic Plans Division. In 1955, while still a rear admiral, he reached the pinnacle of his profession when President Eisenhower appointed him Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), promoting him ahead of nearly 100 more senior officers. During an unprecedented three terms as CNO, Burke sped up the construction of nuclear-powered submarines and initiated the Polaris Ballistic Missile Program.

    Burke retired from the Navy in 1961 after nearly 40 years of service. He remained an influential figure and was at the forefront of efforts to establish the U.S. Navy Memorial in Washington, DC , which was dedicated in 1987. In 1977, Burke was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Navy honored him by naming a new class of guided missile destroyers after him. On July 4, 1991 , the first of these, the USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51), was commissioned in a ceremony attended by Burke and his wife, Roberta.

    When Burke died in 1996, he was hailed as a "sailor's sailor" who defined what it meant to be a naval officer: "relentless in combat, resourceful in command, and revered by his crews."

    Described by a shipmate as "like a bull" who couldn't be stopped, McCloy has the distinction of being one of the few men in the nation's history to earn two Medals of Honor for separate acts of heroism.

    Born in Brewster, NY , McCloy went to sea as an adolescent, by some accounts joining the U.S. Merchant Marine when he was 15. In March 1898 , at age 22, he enlisted in the Navy on the eve of the Spanish-American War.

    During the Boxer Rebellion of 1900, McCloy earned his first Medal of Honor "for distinguished conduct in the presence of the enemy" while participating in a relief expedition to rescue members of the foreign community under siege at 11 ministries in Peking (now Beijing ), China . He was wounded in action on June 22, 1900 , during the seizure of an arsenal near Tientsin (now Tianjin ).

    McCloy earned his second Medal of Honor for his heroism in 1914 when American forces landed at Veracruz, Mexico . On April 21 , Chief Boatswain McCloy was in charge of three picket boats unloading men and supplies at a pier when his detachment came under fire from the nearby Mexican Naval Academy. To expose enemy positions, he took his boat away from the pier and directed fire at the building. His action drew retaliatory fire that allowed cruisers to locate and shell sniper positions, thus protecting the men on shore. McCloy was shot in the thigh but remained at his post for 48 hours until the brigade surgeon sent him to a hospital ship. His medal citation credited him with "distinguished conduct in battle and extraordinary heroism."

    Described by one naval historian as "an almost legendary figure" by the time of the Veracruz incident, McCloy continued to live up to his reputation for bravery. In 1919, now a lieutenant, he was awarded the Navy Cross for "distinguished service" as commander of USS Curlew, which engaged in the "difficult and hazardous duty" of sweeping mines in the North Sea in the aftermath of World War I.

    McCloy retired from active duty in 1928 after a 30-year career in the Navy and "a lifetime of service on all the seven seas," as the Kansas City Star put it. His service record notes that in 1942 he was advanced on the retired list to lieutenant commander after being "specially commended by the Secretary of the Navy for performance of duty in actual combat." McCloy died in 1945. In 1963, the Navy commissioned a destroyer escort named in his honor, the USS McCloy (DE-1038).

    The first black American hero of World War II, Miller became an inspiration to generations of Americans for his actions at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941 .

    Miller was born into a family of sharecroppers and raised near Waco, TX. Imposing in stature, he played football in high school and later showed skills as a heavyweight boxer. In 1939, at 19, Miller enlisted in the Navy as a mess attendant, the only job rating open to Blacks at the time.

    Miller was serving aboard the battleship West Virginia when the Japanese attacked while it was moored at Pearl Harbor . When damage to the ship prevented him from reaching his regular battle station, Miller helped with efforts to rescue his shipmates, scores of whom were wounded or trapped in wreckage. He was later ordered to the bridge to assist in moving the ship's captain, who had been mortally wounded.

    After helping carry the captain to a more sheltered area, Miller took over an unattended 50-caliber machine gun nearby. Though never trained in its operation, he maintained fire on Japanese aircraft until ordered to abandon the bridge as fires raged out of control.

    After the attack, West Virginia 's senior surviving officer wrote in his report that Miller's contributions as a rescuer were crucial, "unquestionably saving the lives of a number of people who might otherwise have been lost." Thanks to press coverage and the tremendous interest of the Black community, Miller (who was often referred to as "Dorie" in press accounts), became, arguably, the best known enlisted sailor of World War II.

    On May 27, 1942 , Miller was awarded the Navy Cross "for distinguished devotion to duty, extraordinary courage and disregard for his own personal safety during the attack on the Fleet in Pearl Harbor ." While presenting the award, Admiral Chester W. Nimitz , commander in chief of the Pacific fleet, commented: "This marks the first time in this conflict that such high tribute has been made in the Pacific fleet to a member of his race and I'm sure that the future will see others similarly honored for brave acts."

    After serving aboard the Indianapolis for nearly a year, Miller took overdue leave and made public appearances in California , Texas and Illinois before being advanced in June 1943 to the rating of officer's cook, third class, and assigned to the new escort aircraft carrier Liscome Bay. On Nov. 24, 1943 , he was killed in action along with more than 600 shipmates when a Japanese submarine torpedoed and sank Liscome Bay during Operation Galvanic, the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. His body was lost at sea.

    Miller received numerous posthumous honors. A destroyer escort, USS Miller (DE-1091), commissioned in 1973, was named for him. A number of elementary schools across the country have been named after Miller. A school, park, cemetery, and YMCA branch in Waco, TX , bear his name.

    Although he was only the first of a number of African Americans to be recognized for their heroism in World War II, Miller is singularly remembered for providing inspiration to a campaign for equal recognition and opportunity for Blacks in the military, a campaign that bore fruit in 1948 when President Truman ordered "that there shall be equality and opportunity for all persons in the armed forces."


    Description

    We are happy to offer a classic style 5 panel custom US Navy frigate FF 1059 USS W S Sims embroidered hat.

    For an additional (and optional) charge of $7.00, our hats can be personalized with up to 2 lines of text of 14 characters each (including spaces), such as with a veteran’s last name and rate and rank on the first line, and years of service on the second line.

    Our FF 1059 USS W S Sims embroidered hat comes in two styles for your choosing. A traditional “high profile” flat bill snap back style (with an authentic green under visor on the bottom of the flat bill), or a modern “medium profile” curved bill velcro back “baseball cap” style. Both styles are “one size fits all”. Our hats are made of durable 100% cotton for breathability and comfort.

    Given high embroidery demands on these “made to order” hats, please allow 4 weeks for shipment.

    If you have any questions about our hat offerings, please contact us at 904-425-1204 or e-mail us at [email protected] , and we will be happy to speak to you!


    This photo of USS W S Sims FF 1059 is exactly as you see it with the matte printed around it. You will have the choice of two print sizes, either 8″x10″ or 11″x14″. The print will be ready for framing, or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing then you can mount it in a larger frame. Your personalized print will look awesome when you frame it.

    We can PERSONALIZE your print of the USS W S Sims FF 1059 with your name, rank and years served and there is NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE for this option. After you place your order you can simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed. For example:

    United States Navy Sailor
    YOUR NAME HERE
    Proudly Served: Your Years Here

    This would make a nice gift for yourself or that special Navy veteran you may know, therefore, it would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

    The watermark “Great Naval Images” will NOT be on your print.

    Media Type Used:

    The USS W S Sims FF 1959 photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high-resolution printer and should last many years. The unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. Most sailors loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had a tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older, the appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience will get stronger. The personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. When you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart.

    We have been in business since 2005 and our reputation for having great products and customer satisfaction is indeed exceptional. You will, therefore, enjoy this product guaranteed.


    W S Sims DE-1059 - History

    From the U.S. Postal Service today:

    Four revered U.S. Navy icons were commemorated with a First-Class salute with the dedication of the Distinguished Sailors collectible stamps. Available nationwide today, the 44-cent stamps immortalize four sailors who served with bravery and distinction during the 20th Century: William S. Sims, Arleigh A. Burke, John McCloy and Doris “Dorie” Miller.

    The dedication ceremony took place today at the United States Navy Memorial in Washington, DC.

    The stamps, designed by Phil Jordan of Falls Church, VA, are based on photographs from Navy archives. Text along the top of the stamp sheet identifies the four sailors, the approximate date of each photograph, and a ship named in honor of each sailor.

    William S. Sims
    Commander of U.S. naval forces in European waters during World War I, Sims (1858-1936) was an outspoken reformer and innovator who helped shape the Navy into a modern fighting force. Frustrated by the Navy bureaucracy, he circumvented his superiors to get the Navy to adopt improved gunfire techniques that increased firing accuracy as ships rolled through ocean swells. He also is noted for promoting the convoy system that grouped ships closely together as they were accompanied by small numbers of Navy escorts while crossing the U-Boat infested Atlantic — saving countless lives in both world wars. The stamp features a detail from a 1919 photograph of Sims and depicts the crest of the destroyer escort USS W.S. Sims (DE-1059), commissioned in 1970.

    Arleigh A. Burke
    After serving as one of the top destroyer squadron commanders of World War II, Burke (1901-1996) had an equally distinguished postwar career in which he played a major role in modernizing the Navy and guiding its response to the Cold War. During World War II, he gained a reputation for brilliance and innovation while commanding Destroyer Squadron 23, known as “the Little Beavers.” The squadron fought in 22 separate actions in a four-month period, sinking or helping to sink nine enemy destroyers and downing 30 airplanes. He later served an unprecedented three terms as the Navy’s highest ranking officer — Chief of Naval Operations — to speed construction of nuclear-powered submarines and initiating the Polaris Ballistic Missile Program. His stamp, based on a 1951 photograph, depicts the crest of the guided missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51), commissioned in 1991.

    John McCloy
    Described by a shipmate as “like a bull” who couldn’t be stopped, McCloy (1876-1945) holds the distinction of being one of the few men in the nation’s history to earn two Medals of Honor for a rescue mission during the Boxer Rebellion in which he was wounded, and during the 1914 Mexican Revolt for intentionally exposing his boat to draw enemy fire to identify their positions for retaliation by U.S. cruiser gunfire. Shot in the thigh, he remained on post 48 hours until the brigade surgeon sent him to a hospital. In 1919 he was awarded the Navy Cross as commander of USS Curlew, which engaged in the “difficult and hazardous duty” of sweeping mines in the North Sea in the aftermath of World War I. His stamp is based on a circa 1920 photograph and depicts the crest of the destroyer escort, USS McCloy (DE-1038), commissioned in 1963.

    Doris Miller
    The first black American hero of World War II, Miller (1919-1943) became an inspiration to generations of Americans for his actions at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. Serving aboard the battleship West Virginia as a mess attendant — the only job rating open to blacks at the time — Miller helped rescue scores of shipmates wounded or trapped in wreckage. He was later ordered to the bridge to help move the ship’s mortally wounded captain. Never trained in its operation, he manned an unattended 50-caliber machine gun to fire on Japanese aircraft until ordered to abandon the bridge as fires raged out of control. He was later awarded the Navy Cross. Miller was promoted in June 1943 to Officer’s Cook Third Class aboard the new escort aircraft carrier Liscome Bay and was killed in action on Nov. 24 that year along with more than 600 shipmates when an enemy torpedo sank the ship during the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. His body was lost at sea. His stamp is based on a 1942 photograph and depicts the crest of the destroyer escort USS Miller (DE-1091), commissioned in 1973. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr., portrayed Miller in the 2001 movie Pearl Harbor.


    USPS Featured Stamps


    With the issuance of the Distinguished Sailors stamps in February 2010, the U.S. Postal Service honors four sailors who served with bravery and distinction during the 20th century: William S. Sims, Arleigh A. Burke, John McCloy, and Doris Miller.

    Commander of U.S. naval forces in European waters during World War I, William S. Sims (1858-1936) was an outspoken reformer and innovator who helped shape the Navy into a modern fighting force.

    Sims continued to write and lecture about naval reform until his death in 1936, at which time the New York Herald Tribune declared that he had “influenced our naval course more than any man who ever wore the uniform.” The Navy has named three destroyers after Sims. The most recent, USS W. S. Sims (DE-1059), was commissioned in 1970.

    The William S. Sims stamp features a detail from a photograph of Sims (1919). Beside the photograph is a depiction of the crest of the destroyer escort USS W. S. Sims (DE-1059), which was commissioned in 1970.

    After serving as one of the top destroyer squadron commanders of World War II, Arleigh A. Burke (1901-1996) had an equally distinguished postwar career in which he played a major role in modernizing the Navy and guiding its response to the Cold War.

    When Burke died in 1996, he was hailed as a “sailor’s sailor” who defined what it meant to be a naval officer: “relentless in combat, resourceful in command, and revered by his crews.”

    The Arleigh A. Burke stamp features a detail from a photograph of Burke (1951). Beside the photograph is a depiction of the crest of the guided missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51), which was commissioned in 1991.

    Described by a shipmate as “like a bull” who couldn’t be stopped, John McCloy (1876-1945) has the distinction of being one of the few men in the nation’s history to earn two Medals of Honor for separate acts of heroism.

    McCloy retired from active duty in 1928 after a thirty-year career in the Navy and “a lifetime of service on all the seven seas,” as the Kansas City Star put it. His service record notes that in 1942 he was advanced on the retired list to lieutenant commander after being “specially commended by the Secretary of the Navy for performance of duty in actual combat.” McCloy died in 1945. In 1963, the Navy commissioned a destroyer escort, USS McCloy (DE-1038), which was named in his honor.

    The John McCloy stamp features a detail from a photograph of McCloy (circa 1920). Beside the photograph is a depiction of the crest of the destroyer escort, USS McCloy (DE-1038), which was commissioned in 1963.

    The first African American hero of World War II, Doris Miller (1919-1943) became an inspiration to generations of Americans for his actions at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

    Although he was only the first of a number of African Americans to be recognized for their heroism in World War II, Miller is singularly remembered for providing inspiration to a campaign for equal recognition and opportunity for Blacks in the military, a campaign that bore fruit in 1948 when President Truman ordered “that there shall be equality and opportunity for all persons in the armed forces.”

    The Doris Miller stamp features a detail from a photograph of Miller (1942). Beside the photograph is a depiction of the crest of the destroyer escort USS Miller (DE-1091), which was commissioned in 1973.


    Watch the video: Sims 1 - Sims 2 - Sims 3 - Sims 4: School - Evolution (December 2021).